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Category: RSS (page 1 of 3)

Micro.blog Posts Moved Out of Your 40Tech RSS Feed (and into Their Own Feed)

My foray into micro.blog is a work in progress. Micro.blog is a service that allows you to publish Twitter-like updates to your own site, but also have them appear in a familiar timeline interface at micro.blog. The idea is that you can own your content.

Since first going live with micro.blog, all my micro.blog posts have resided on the front page of 40Tech and in the main RSS feed, as well as at micro.blog. To help those who didn’t want to see those posts in their feed, I set up a feed to let you exclude those posts.

It’s time for some more tweaking. I realized I was refraining from posting to micro.blog because I didn’t want more trivial items to show up on the main page at 40Tech and in the main RSS feed. To remove that friction, I’ve removed the micro.blog posts from the home page at 40Tech, and from the RSS feed. You can still see all the micro.blog costs in their own section of the site. They also have their own RSS feed. Those who want to get all the content from 40Tech should subscribe to both the main feed and the micro.blog feed. If you’re on micro.blog, you can also follow me there. Of course, you can still follow me on Twitter.


Slim Down 40Tech’s RSS Feed

[February 24, 2018 update: I’ve further tweaked how I’m handling micro.blog posts. They’re no longer on the main page, but in their own section of the site and in their own RSS feed.]

Original post:

A couple of weeks ago, I made the decision to use micro.blog to keep all my Twitter-like posts here at 40Tech.com. That post explained my reasoning behind it. The side effect for RSS subscribers is your feed got a bit busier with short “micro” posts, and you may have some posts in your feed that are “Untitled.”

If you want to exclude these microblog-style posts from your feed, you can do so by using this feed link:

40Tech RSS Feed Exluding Microblog Posts

You can continue to get all posts at the normal RSS feed link.


Untitled Posts at 40Tech

Some of you reading 40Tech in an RSS reader might see some posts with “Untitled” or something similar as the title of some posts. This isn’t a case of me forgetting to add a title to some posts, but is what happens when I post a microblog item, which by definition doesn’t have a title. Some RSS readers handle this well. Others don’t.

I initially worked on some RSS hacks to try to replace “Untitled” with something else, such as placeholder text or a snippet of the body of the post. But I’ve been persuaded by a couple of posts I’ve seen elsewhere online.

Dave Winer, from Scripting News:

An idea, they could do what Frank asked me to do, show the first few words from the post in the list view. And nothing in the right view. These items have no titles for artistic reasons. The author did not put them there. You, as a software developer, are not entitled to add them (haha that’s a pun).

And Manton Reece, the creator of micro.blog:

I agree with Dave on this. Titles are clearly optional in the RSS 2.0 spec. The fix for the “Untitled” text that some feed readers use isn’t for authors to add titles where they aren’t needed, it’s for the UI in feed readers to improve so that they gracefully handle title-less posts.

So if you are seeing “Untitled” in your feed reader, it is in part due to how your feed reader handles titleless posts. For now I’m going to see how this develops.


Bypass Truncated RSS Feeds With Mr. Reader

I understand why some sites need to truncate their RSS feeds. If you’re not visiting the full site, you’re not experiencing the site as the site owner intended, and the site may be losing out on revenue from display ads. Regardless of the reasons, truncated feeds are inefficient for the reader. With Mr. Reader, an iPad RSS Reader, there is a workaround of sorts.

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Here’s How I’m Replacing Google Reader – For Now

Google Reader alternativesAs you probably know, Google Reader says its final farewell on July 1. Earlier today, we finally received a news update from the developer of Reeder, the popular iOS app that many people used to follow their favorite RSS feeds. Reeder for iPhone already supports a few different services, but Reeder for Mac and iPad only supports Google Reader. Support for additonal services is supposedly on the way, but I decided I can’t wait any longer, and I’ve cobbled together a few apps to get RSS reader functionality on Mac, the iPad, and iPhone.

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