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Category: Legal Tech (page 1 of 4)

Recently Published – “How to Keep Your Mobile Workspace Secure: 12 Tips to Follow”


The Legal Intelligencer recently published an article I wrote, “How to Keep Your Mobile Workplace Secure: 12 Tips to Follow.” You’ll need to register for an account to read the article, but you’ll get to read five free articles every 30 days.

The Legal Intelligencer is the oldest daily law journal published in the United States, and serves the Philadelphia area. It is available in print and online.

 

Update: the article also was picked up by Legaltech News, a national sister publication to the Legal Intelligencer.


Upcoming Publication – “How to Navigate Cybersecurity in 2018”

The Pennsylvania Bar Association publishes the Pennsylvania Lawyer magazine six times a year. The magazine, which has a circulation of approximately 25,000, has published one of my articles, “How to Navigate Cybersecurity in 2018,” in the March edition. The article covers tips a law firm can take to protect itself from cyber threats.

If you’re a Pennsylvania Bar Association member, look for the magazine in your mailbox. The publication is also distributed to the news media and libraries.


Lawyers Can’t Secretly Track Emails, Illinois Bar Says →

Mindy L. Rattan writing for Big Law Business:

Bar panels in at least four jurisdictions now say it is unethical to use “web bugs” or other email tracking software to monitor how and when recipients review and circulate emails and other electronic documents.

With some email apps offering read receipts, email tracking is pretty easy for anyone to set up. Many people, lawyers included, probably enable it without second thought. Something to have on your radar. UPDATE: In Illinois at least, certain types of read receipts are acceptable.

Hat tip to David Roth for posting a link to the story on Twitter.


Jury Research: Ethics Risk or Competency Requirement? →

Mark C. Palmer writing for Attorney at Work:

While the ABA may liken a “passive” review of potential jurors’ social media to “driving by,” it is not always so simple. The distinction comes when the researcher must log in, or take some affirmative identifying step before accessing the information.

The ethics rules on using social media to investigate jurors differ from state to state, so you’ll have to do some homework in your jurisdiction. In some places, the notification email a service like Twitter sends when you follow someone can by itself be an ethics violation.


Appearance at Legal X Conference This Week

The Legal X Conference takes place this week in Park City, Utah, running from Thursday, September 14 through Friday, September 15. Legal X focuses on issues in Plaintiff Law, and takes place at the Treasure Mountain Inn at the top of Park City’s Main Street

I’ll be speaking this year. My topic is “Set Your Practice on Auto-Pilot,” and I’ll be talking about automation tools to up your personal productivity game. Other topics will cover how to hire and train your staff, effective case management strategies, facilitating the intake process, and more.

I believe there are still a few openings, so you can register for the conference.