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Category: iOS (page 1 of 33)

Use Apple Maps to Find Businesses That Take Apple Pay

Apple Pay is faster and more secure than paying with a credit card. It’s also convenient, especially with an Apple Watch. The problem, at least where I live, is it still isn’t accepted everywhere.

One way to find out where Apple Pay is accepted is to use Apple Maps. You can search for a specific business or perform a general geographic search.

Search for a business

To find out if a business takes Apple Pay, simply search for the business in Apple Maps. Once you’ve selected the business, scroll down in the item listing, and look for the Apple Pay logo.

Search near you

To do a general search of which nearby businesses accept Apple Pay, type “Apple Pay” in the Maps search box. I found this showed me several nearby businesses, but it did omit some places I know accept Apple Pay.

Let’s hope Apple Pay and other contactless payment methods are someday accepted almost everywhere, but for now you can do a bit of work to figure out where to use it.


iPhone J.D.’s Tips for using 3D Touch →

Jeff Richardson, writing for iPhone J.D.:

If you tap on the Messages app icon, you will probably see your most recent text message conversation.  But if you 3D Touch on the Messages app, you will see a list of names of folks who have recently had text message conversations with you.  Assuming that you wanted to send a message to, or review a recent message from, one of those three people, this is a faster way to jump directly to the text message conversation with that person.

If you’re like me, 3D Touch is a feature you intend to use more but never do. Maybe this article by Jeff Richardson is the impetus you need. Jeff describes several handy ways to use 3D Touch. If nothing else, make sure you heed the tip for using 3D Touch to move your cursor when typing.


Aeon Timeline for iOS Released

If you’re a lawyer, writer, or student, or work in any other profession that needs to digest dates visually, a timeline tool can be indispensable. I’ve found Aeon Timeline on the Mac to be fantastic and was vaguely aware that an iOS version was in development. This morning I awoke to an email announcing that Aeon Timeline for iOS is now available.

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Using the Workflow App on My iPad to Control My Desk Phone

A simple change in scenery can do wonders for productivity. For me that sometimes means sitting in a recliner in the corner of my office, using my MacBook and my office phone headset to make and receive calls. That’s possible because my firm’s VOIP phone service, Mitel, offers a Mac app that lets me trigger outgoing calls on my office phone. As long as I have my MacBook and telephone headset with me, my actual telephone unit can be across the office.

This process doesn’t work if I want to use my iPad to initiate calls. The Mitel iOS app won’t trigger calls on another device, such as my office phone. Not to be deterred, I put together a workflow to accomplish this. It sounds much more complicated (and much slower) than it really is.

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Hyper-Scheduling Light With Things

I’m a big fan of the work of David Sparks of MacSparky and the Mac Power Users Podcast. He’s recently written a few posts on what he has called “hyper-scheduling.” The CliffsNotes version of hyper-scheduling is that David blocks off time in his calendar for performing certain tasks. Jeff Perry of the Tablet Habit does this too, calling it Time Blocking.

As I’ve read David and Jeff’s insights, I realized I’m doing “hyper-scheduling light” (perhaps ultralight) with Things. This is one of the reasons Things has clicked for me.

hyper-scheduling Light

My job isn’t suited for the scheduling of specific times during the day for performing certain tasks. I’m faced with too many unavoidable interruptions and too many tasks that arise suddenly and need to be handled on short notice. As much as I’d love to go into “do not disturb” mode to churn through work, there are too many downsides of this for me on most days in my line of work.

Despite these roadblocks, I do have a general idea how much time I’ll have each day for churning through my task list. I just don’t know exactly when during the day that time will fall. Enter Things.

With its “Today” and “Upcoming” views, Things makes it easy to schedule my tasks for certain dates. I set an item’s start date, and it appears in the view for that day. 1 During my weekly review, which usually occurs on Friday, I plan out my next week. I go through my actions and tasks and decide what I want to get done on each day of the upcoming week. When a particular day arrives, my task list for the day is waiting for me.

This isn’t for everyone. Some people work better diving into their projects each day, and picking from their tasks or next actions. That became too overwhelming for me, which is one of the reasons I switched to Things. I wanted a tool that would not only help me organize my tasks, but would help me do them as well by bringing them to me on certain days. Things does that for me by allowing me to schedule them.


  1. OmniFocus supports start dates as well, and you can view a schedule in Forecast view, but items that aren’t completed on their start date fall off of the Forecast. It remains to be seen whether the new version of OmniFocus will change this.