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Category: iOS (page 2 of 32)

Link Post Workflow with Ulysses and Workflow on iOS

A link post is a type of post common on many blogs, including here at 40Tech, where the post links to a story on another site. The purpose of a link post is to say to the reader, “Hey, here’s a good story.” Often the post adds a few words of commentary. The post on sharing your WiFi credentials with a QR code was an example of a link post.

I’ve recently come up with an easy way create a link post on 40Tech using Ulysses and the Workflow app on iOS. I copy the author’s name to the clipboard, select the text I want to quote, and run the workflow via Safari’s share sheet. The workflow prompts me for the name of the other site, before opening Ulysses with my post almost all ready to go. All that’s left for me to do in Ulysses is add some comments, pick my tags and categories, and publish the post.

Behind the Scenes

Here’s what happens, mostly behind the scenes, in the Workflow app:

  1. After Workflow asks me to type the name of the publication, it sets it as a variable;
  2. Workflow gets the clipboard contents (which should be the author’s name, if you copied the name to your clipboard as I explained above), changes it to title case in the event that it isn’t properly capitalized, and sets it as a variable;
  3. Workflow gets the URL from the Safari web page, as well as the text I selected on the page;
  4. Workflow puts together the pieces and creates the text for the post; and
  5. Workflow opens Ulysses with the text as a new sheet.

In the first part of step 4, above, Workflow creates a header tag (#) followed by the name of the story as a clickable link. That’s because Ulysses will take the URL that follows a header tag in the first line and add it as a “linked_list_url” custom field on my WordPress blog. That’s what makes the title of my link posts clickable, and sends you to the other site when you click the title.

Here is a screenshot of the entire workflow:

Here is a link to download the complete workflow in the Workflow directory. I realize the final two steps could probably be redone using a “New Ulysses Sheet” action, but this is working so I’m not messing with it. If you are going to use the workflow yourself, you’ll need to change the path at the end of the second-to-last step to point to a group that already exists in your Ulysses setup (mine points to 40Tech > Linked).

My link post workflow on iOS is now almost as efficient as it is on Mac. More on my Mac workflow soon.

How to Let Guests Connect to Your Wi-Fi Network Using a QR Code (Without Sharing Your Password) →

Khamosh Pathak writing for iPhone Hacks:

iOS 11 comes with QR scanning feature built-in. So all they’d have to do is point their iPhone camera to the QR Code, tap on the notification, confirm and they’ll be connected.

I know my weekend project. Hit up the full article at iPhone Hacks for instructions.

The iPhone Battery Replacement Program Has Genius Bar Appointments in Short Supply

(UPDATE 2018-02-01 – I went online again this morning, and appointments were more plentiful. I have no idea if that means Apple has added capacity, or if my previous experience uncovered  a temporary glitch in their system.)

If you need a Genius Bar appointment for an Apple device, good luck. It’s only one source, but an Apple online advisor has told me that Genius Bars are booked solid dealing with the iPhone battery replacement program.

I ‘m having a power issue with my iPad Pro, and tried to schedule a Genius Bar Appointment for the Apple Store near me. You’re normally able to go online and book these appointments as much as a week in advance, but there wasn’t a single opening over the next week. I thought I might have better luck if I spoke to an online Apple advisor, so I went that route, and she wasn’t able to get me an appointment at my local store either.1 She told me that Genius Bars are at capacity due to the battery replacement program.


With as much press coverage as the battery replacement program received, this isn’t the least bit surprising. This is something to keep in mind if you are having any issues with your Apple devices.

OmniFocus 3 and OmniFocus for the Web →

Ken Case writing for the Omni Blog:

For all our customers in that situation, I have good news to share: we’re building OmniFocus for the Web. It will be greatly simplified from the OmniFocus you know: it won’t have custom perspectives or notifications or maps. It won’t have Review. It won’t let you set up new repeating tasks (though it will correctly handle repeating tasks that are already set up). Its capabilities will be a lot more like what we shipped in our very first iPhone app: you’ll be able to see the lists of tasks in your Inbox, Projects, and Tags, with their associated notes and due dates. You’ll be able to edit basic information about those tasks (checking them off, assigning a due date, changing a title or note) and of course you’ll be able to add new tasks.

This blog post by the head of the Omni Group is filled to the brim with information on what the company plans for 2018, including a new version of OmniOutliner for iOS, and a new version of OmniFocus. The introduction (finally) of tags would have been big news on its own, but the announcement of OmniFocus for the Web might be even bigger if you need to use Windows.

Apple Releases Employee Starter Guides for Mac and iOS

If you’re trying to get coworkers up to speed on Mac or iOS, Apple has recently released two books to help: Employee Starter Guide for Mac and Employee Starter Guide for iOS. I’ve just started going through them, but they seem to start at the ground level, and build from there.

Employee Starter Guide for Mac

Both books are broken into four sections: Learning the Basics, Next Steps in Working with Mac/iOS, Extending Productivity Further, and Support for Mac/iOS. Each section is broken into subsections that go into detail about using a Mac/iOS device for different aspects of work, such as for collaboration.

Employee Starter Guide for iOS

Employee Starter Guide for Mac sample subsections

The books include recommendations for third party apps where appropriate. For example, the iOS book recommends PDF Expert and three other apps in the “Annotating PDFs and Forms” section.

Tech geeks are accustomed to finding answers and help online, but these books might be helpful to “normal” users who are just getting started with Mac or iOS. If you are looking for reference materials for your employees, or even for yourself, check these out.

Hat tip to Dave Marra, who mentioned this on Twitter.