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Category: Apple (page 1 of 35)

Apple discontinues its own photo printing service, recommends third-party Photos Projects apps instead →

Benjamin Mayo writing for 9to5Mac:

Apple is discontinuing its Photo Print Products service, which has been integrated into iPhoto since its launch in 2002. The service expanded from simple prints, to albums, photo books, and calendars.

Maybe I’m a dinosaur, but I used this service every year to make a Mother’s Day calendar for my wife and our daughter’s grandmothers. The story does mention some third-party apps that include Photos Projects extensions, so this isn’t a complete loss. Still, I’m sad to see it go. I hope the third-party solutions are as elegant as the Apple solution.


Add a Folder to the Sidebar in DEVONthink for Easy Access →

Jim Neumann, for the DEVONtechnologies blog:

Drag this folder to the Favorites section of DEVONthink’s sidebar. This will give you quick access to the group.

The post at the link talks about how to use DEVONthink as a “read it later” service, but that’s not what caught my eye. I had no idea you could add folders to the Favorites section of the sidebar. You can do it by either dragging a folder onto the word “Favorites” in the sidebar (I couldn’t drag it directly to the spot I wanted among my favorites – it went to the bottom automatically), or by right-clicking on a folder/group, and choosing “Add to Favorites.” I still learn something new about DEVONthink almost every week, and I’ve been using the program for several years now.


DEVONthink adds iCloud sync →

Eric Böhnisch-Volkmann, writing for the Devonian Times (the DEVONtechnolgies blog):

Sychronization via iCloud was the no. 1 feature request on our list. And here we go: DEVONthink 2.10 and DEVONthink To Go 2.6 let you keep your databases in sync via iCloud and without entering anything except for the optional encryption password. No messing around with sync store names, server addresses, or login credentials. Add the iCloud sync location, check off the databases you want to sync, done. It can’t be any easier.

This is the feature in this update that will get most people excited, assuming they have enough iCloud space. But some of the other features, such as improvements to syncing on both platforms, are just as important. There’s a pretty good list here, so check out the full post.


Fix Your Contact List with a Centralized System →

Ryan Gray, writing at ryangray.co:

Of course, you can easily share one of your cards with anyone nearby (and get theirs). But a shared card is not just sent once. It’s a subscription. If you change your phone number or if you move you’ll be able to push the updates out to anyone who is subscribed. You’ll also be able to block anyone, revoke access, or prevent someone from sharing your card. Conversely you’ll be able to upgrade to the next level. For example if you become close friends with a coworker, they’ll be able to request access to the Close Friends version of your card. You’ll also be in control of what of your information can be shared with third party developers.

This article hits on a great concept – a better way to share your contact information with others that keeps you in control of that information, and also keeps your information up to date as it changes. Ryan Gray wants a privacy-oriented tech company (Apple) to come up with a cross-platform and centralized solution.

I love the idea, but worry that something like this wouldn’t gain enough traction. My contact information is half of the equation. The organization of my own list of contacts is the other half. My contact list is filled with duplicates and outdated data, as well as contacts I haven’t touched in 20 years. If the people in my contact list don’t embrace or trust a system like this, I’m not much better off. But we have to start somewhere, and this is the best idea I’ve heard.


Show Hidden Files on Your Mac With a Keyboard Shortcut

Some files and folders on your Mac are hidden by default. Your Library folder within your user folder, for example, is hidden, as is the actual iCloud Drive data folder. I discovered this when trying to find a way to create a redundant backup of my iCloud data.

There are a few ways to make your hidden files visible. I’ve found the quickest method is to use a keyboard shortcut. If you type and release Command-Shift-. (that’s a dot, or period, at the end), your hidden files will become visible in the Finder. Type it again and they’ll disappear. That’s all there is to it.