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Category: Twitter (page 1 of 5)

Your Favorite Twitter App Is About to Break

After June 19, 2018, Twitter is removing streaming services from third-party apps such as Tweetbot and Twitterific. This means that you won’t receive push notifications from those apps, and your timeline won’t refresh automatically.

Twitter is doing this to focus “on data features and access, more than on delivering client app product features.”1 Despite having third-party apps to thank for much of whatever success it currently has, Twitter wants you to use the Twitter website, or its own apps. That’s where the money is. Unfortunately (for me, at least), my head hurts whenever I use Twitter’s native offerings.

If Twitter doesn’t change course before June 19, I could see myself spending even more time on micro.blog than I am now. There could be many other users of third-party apps who use Twitter much less, too.


Summify Acquired by Twitter (and Going Bye Bye)

Summify Acquired by Twitter (and Going Bye Bye) | 40Tech

Back in August of last year, we wrote about Summify, a fantastic tool for getting to and sharing the highlights of your social streams and feeds. I’ve used this tool religiously for the past several months and have found it to be incredibly useful, especially with Twitter. Just last week, however, I received an email from the Vancouver-based start-up and discovered that they had become yet another in a long line of services to be snatched up and absorbed by a tech giant — in this case, Twitter. Great for them, but sad for you and me.

The Summify team will be moving to San Francisco, where they will become a part of Twitter’s growth team. Summify the service will be stripped down for the time being, and will eventually shutdown altogether as a standalone product.

Here’s the main list of changes from their announcement:

  • New account registrations have been disabled.
  • Email summaries remain, but only for a few weeks, and then they are gone as well.
  • Users will still receive their summaries via the web app (and the iPhone app, as well, I believe), but will no longer be able to make them public.
  • Profile and influence pages are gone, as is auto-publish.

I’ve also noticed that sharing posts to Twitter from Summify no longer adds credits to the end of the tweet. Previously, the tweet would add in an @mention to a few of those in your network that shared the information with you in the first place, but this is no longer the case, at least from the mobile app.

There is no word yet as to when Summify will shut down completely, or what cool newness might arise in Twitter as a result. Either way, while I’m happy for the people behind the great service, I will really miss Summify as a standalone tool. Hopefully, something truly great comes out of this. In the meantime, we can only hope that Zite — and maybe Flipboard — will pick up the slack by improving how they filter our streams.


Social Media Overload: How Has Your Social Media Usage Changed Since the Release of Google+? [Reader Feedback]

Social media overload

We’re big fans of Google+ here at 40Tech. In fact, if you follow the Twitter accounts of either 40Tech or Bobby Travis, you’ll see that we’re not posting there quite as much as we did in the past. Are we alone in the way Google+ has detracted from our ability to be as active on Twitter? Let us know how your social media usage has changed since Google+ has arrived.

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Plume: My Android Twitter App of Choice [App of the Week]

Plume

I have a confession to make. If I follow you on Twitter, there’s a good chance that I don’t see any of your tweets. Twitter got so busy for me, that the only way that I could manage it, was to sort people into lists. I have several lists, but I have one super-special list for the tweets of users that I don’t want to miss. When I’m busy, that’s the only part of Twitter that I ever see. When I try out Twitter apps, therefore, list support is the first thing I check out. That’s why I use Plume . . . but I’m open to suggestions for an app that handles lists even better. If you know of one, let us know in the comments.

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How To Bring the Classic Retweet (RT) Back to the New Twitter

The revamp that Twitter rolled out on the Twitter website a few months ago was, by and large, a nice upgrade. The sidebar is now pretty useful, and the whole experience is a bit more streamlined and efficient. One feature that many people don’t like, though, is how the new Twitter handles retweets. The old method of retweeting (the “RT @” method) allowed you to editorialize a bit, if you wanted. Under new Twitter, the retweet button simply rebroadcasts the original tweet, unedited. You no longer have the ability to add any thoughts to the tweet, short of starting a new tweet. Google+, and the way it fosters interaction, has shown us that geeks love discussion and editorial, if the topic is right. If you want to bring back the classic RT to Twitter web, you can. Here’s how.

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