...

Menu Close

Tag: Pinterest

Springpad vs Pinterest vs Evernote vs… Nobody?

Springpad 3.0 vs Pinterest vs Evernote vs... Nobody? | 40Tech

It used to be that the biggest comparison Springpad had to contend with was is it better than Evernote? Not anymore. With the newly realized vision of Springpad 3.0, the powerful and flexible digital notebook service now finds itself facing off against the hottest web service du jour: Pinterest.

The folks at Springpad have taken something their software has always been able to do — namely, the ability to collect, organize, and share stuff you find online — prettified it and opened up the social pipelines in a big way. It’s easier to explore for new and interesting content. It’s easier to connect with people who have similar interests. But it’s also easier do something that neither Evernote nor Pinterest can provide without help: make the things that you save actionable.

 

Explore and Follow Interesting Public Notebooks in Springpad 3.0Use Nearly Any Smartphone, Tablet, or Computer for SpringpadNew Notebook Layout in Springpad 3.0Home Ideas Notebook in Springpad 3.0Task Management in Springpad 3.0

 

Jack of All Trades vs Focused Expertise

The greatest strength of Springpad is the same thing that has held it back over the years: there’s just so much — maybe too much — that you can do with it. Evernote and Pinterest, no matter how you use them or how many other services integrate them, each really do just one thing.

  • Evernote makes it easy to take notes and to search for and find them later.
  • Pinterest does visual bookmarking. End of story.

They don’t sound all that glamorous when you boil them down to their base elements, but they don’t need to. Each service does its one thing extremely well — better than everyone else, in fact. There’s power in that. Simplicity engenders trust, niche marketing, yadda yadda.

Springpad, on the other hand, can do all of the following (and more):

  • Take notes and make it easy to find them
  • Visual bookmarking (socially-focused now, just like Pinterest)
  • Personal shopping assistant (finds deals for you and such)
  • Task management (including reminders and integration with Google Calendar)
  • Collaborative planning (including corkboard-style planning for the visually inclined)
  • Etc, etc, etc

To top it off, there are several tools in Springpad that make it easy to classify and organize the various types of information you might want to collect — everything from recipes, to bookmarks, to wine and product wish lists, tasks, notes, files, and more. You can do all of these things quickly and easily from almost any smartphone or computer. They even help you to find new things that you’re interested in, use HTML 5 to give you offline access, and allow you to work with multiple people on private or public notebooks — and they do it all for free!

With all of that — and for free — Springpad should be at the top of the heap, right? Unfortunately, the reality is that their quest to become the ultimate digital notebook — which I believe they are, all things considered — creates a product that some may find intimidating. The immediate impression is that there is too much to learn, and not enough time to invest in it.

 

But Wait! Springpad Might Have Found the Secret Sauce…

Thankfully, the new, more visual design of Springpad 3.0 takes a lot of that intimidation factor away. The new design introduces a sort of visual simplicity that is easy on the eyes, and makes you want to click through and explore. You can even explore the public notebooks without having your own Springpad account, searching through different interest categories to find everything from great design and gift ideas to awesome places to eat in the city of Boston (or wherever).

If you’re looking for a definitive guide to Springpad, regular 40Tech commenter Daniel Gold has just released his second eBook, Springpad: Smarter Notebooks, Smarter Sharing, A Smarter Way to Get Things Done [affiliate link]. It’s 80+ pages of Springpad ins and outs for just $5.

 

In these different notebooks, you can find images, videos, commentary, and more — and if you get an account of your own you can “Spring” your favourites into your own public or private notebooks, add alerts for price drops, add a task or reminder to make sure you remember to look at it again, and so much more. As I said, the information becomes more than just a note or a bookmark, it becomes something you can act upon, in an ecosystem that facilitates forward movement instead of a vague list of interests or a virtual filing cabinet you may never open again.

Springpad shouldn’t be compared to Evernote or Pinterest. Not directly, anyway. It’s become an entity of its own, a place where users are interacting with trusted sources,  free to save and act on the things that matter most to them. Springpad 3.0 is a platform that can be easily adopted to suit your needs, be they a simple notebook, a place to find ideas, or a GTD task manager. It can even stand alongside of Evernote or Pinterest, should you want it to.

Go check it out. See what you think. We’d love to hear about it!


3 Easy Tips to Help Build Pinterest Followers

image

40Tech is pleased to present a guest post by Molly Borter.

It’s no secret that Pinterest has taken over the social networking sphere. Recent studies show the site is generating more referral traffic to websites than LinkedIn, Google+, and YouTube combined, and with over 10 million registered viewers—the majority of which are female—it seems like brands everywhere are cashing in on the virtual pinboard craze. A soaring amount of traffic to your site just for pinning cool stuff?  That’s pretty awesome if you ask me, and a lot easier than other link building and social networking tactics.

Here are three easy ways to build followers on Pinterest and increase traffic to your brand:

Follow Your Niche

The simplest way to build your followers on Pinterest: follow users who actively pin items, ideas, and interests in your niche. Does your brand target middle-aged women? Follow these users! Also, brainstorm and find other brands that they might be interested in—Michaels, Martha Stewart, HGTV, Real Simple—and follow that brand’s followers. By following pinners in your niche, you are giving them the opportunity to discover something similar to their interests: your brand.

Pin Their Interests

Along with following those who might be interested in your brand, you should create boards and pin items that your niche is interested in. Pinterest frowns upon solely pinning products from your site, and Pinterest users can see right through these spammy tactics. Instead, channel your niche and create general boards that they’ll want to follow.  If you’re selling women’s accessories, create boards pertaining to fashion, beauty, classics, and trends. If you’re selling travel products, create boards pertaining to your favorite places, dream destinations, cool souvenirs, and travel tips. The more well-rounded and thoughtful your pins and boards are, the more followers you’ll have who trust your brand.

Create Pin-able Content

The key to building your Pinterest fan base is creating awesome, pin-able content. Swoon-worthy images and graphics are Pinterest gold, so make sure to include them in your brand’s blog posts and pin those. One cool picture or interesting piece of content could get you anywhere from 5 site visits to 30,000 site visits or more, so take your take your time when creating the best content. Charming images, colorful infographics, and crafty designs are the way to go. “Pin It to Win It”-style contests are popular, too, and help you build followers while increasing traffic to and conversion for your site. Pinterest is a win-win.

About the Author:  Molly Borter works as a social media specialist for Reading Glasses Shopper. When she’s not creating social waves on Pinterest or tracking the latest glasses trends, she enjoys running, trying new recipes, and reading suspense novels.


What’s The Deal With Pinterest? Even My Wife Likes (Obsesses Over) It!

image

So, Pinterest… It’s received a lot of coverage in the past year — it’s even received in the realm of 37 million in funding — but I had trouble seeing the appeal. I wasn’t sure the world needed another social bookmarking site. I wasn’t sure the world needed another way to share, well… anything. I admit, most of this feeling had nothing to do with Pinterest, per se, it was really more about social media overwhelm. I’ve seen a ton of social sharing services go up and down over the past few years, and, as much as I love Google+, I think it maxed me out. Besides, you can do things similar to Pinterest using tools like Evernote and Springpad, right? Right?

Then my lovely wife — a person who has no real interest in tech, barely any interest in social networking, and who only got a smartphone because it was free and I “was bugging her about it” — was somehow inspired to try it out. No prompting from me, or anyone else — she came to it entirely on her own. Now… she’s obsessed. Seriously. For example, I see her awake at 3AM and think that she’s feeding the baby, or something — but no. What’s she’s doing is maniacally pinning and re-pinning things to her boards, and often giggling like mad as she does it. There is apparently a lot of funny on Pinterest…

Title Image clipped from Pinterest Comic

image

Recently, she’s taken to sharing some of that funny with me, and I’ve discovered that a good portion of it is Star Wars based. This confused the hell out of me (though I still shared some of it with you here and here). My wife has no interest in Star Wars. She’s one of the few people who has never even seen the films, and (horrifyingly) will actually say things like “What’s a hansolo?” I still love her, though. She’s that awesome. She’s beginning to make me see value in Pinterest, too. Anything that could inspire my wife to share seriously awesome Star Wars stuffs with me has got to be pretty powerful.

image  image  image

image

I checked it out a little more thoroughly. I wanted to know what the deal was. Was there a secret sauce? How did it hook her? What I discovered was four things:

Pinterest is incredibly simple.

Pinterest is to sharing fun and useful images what Evernote is to easy, accessible note-taking. It focuses on that one thing, and makes sure that it is the absolute best at it. It doesn’t overwhelm the user.

 

Pinterest is visual — and good at it.

Everyone loves a good picture and everyone loves a good photo gallery. Funny and beautiful pics have been making the rounds since the internet was able to support them. People like to look at the images they like again and again.  And share them, re-share them, and re-share them again, as well. Pinterest makes this easy, but it also makes it beautiful. The designers have done a fantastic job of taking something that could be overwhelming, both in general and visually, and making it joy to experience.

My Wife's Pinterest Categories

 

Like crafty things? This is your home.

There are a ton of cool things to discover on Pinterest, but it really seems to have taken off with the crafty and DIY crowd. This is what ultimately hooked my wife. She loves to see things that people have made, especially if it involves baking or making something cool out of something else. She knows I like that sort of thing as well, and has not only shared some cool Star Wars crafts with me, but also a lot of DIY upcycling and repurposing projects. It’s how I came across Homestyler, actually, which was the topic of my previous post. There is some very cool stuff on Pinterest, and more is pinned every day.

Some of My Wife’s Pins

image  image  image  image

 

It connects to the real world. It useful.

Pinterest is more than just a place to store and share images. The images link back to the site you found them on — and if we follow the crafty and DIY point from above, you end up with well-organized, very visual bookmarks back to sites that contain information that you might actually use in your real-world life. This makes Pinterest more than just a random bookmarking service, and more than just an image-sharing service. It makes it a tool that is useful to you both on and offline. It helps you to find, share, save and use things that are of interest to you.

image

 

We’ve all heard that “<insert service> makes it easy to collect and organize what interests you on the web.” Pinterest actually does it. My wife is living proof. Anything tech-based that can make her go gaga is definitely worth taking a look at. It’s still in beta, but getting an account happens pretty quickly. I recommend giving Pinterest a try. You’ll probably love it.

What do you think of Pinterest? How do you use it?