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Tag: Networking (page 1 of 2)

How to Let Guests Connect to Your Wi-Fi Network Using a QR Code (Without Sharing Your Password) →

Khamosh Pathak writing for iPhone Hacks:

iOS 11 comes with QR scanning feature built-in. So all they’d have to do is point their iPhone camera to the QR Code, tap on the notification, confirm and they’ll be connected.

I know my weekend project. Hit up the full article at iPhone Hacks for instructions.


Apple Kills Off Several MacOS Server Features

It sure sounds like macOS Server isn’t long for this world. Apple has announced a number of services that are being removed from Server, including Calendar, Contacts, DHCP, DNS, Mail, Messages, NetInstall, VPN, Websites, and Wiki. In addition, FTP support and iOS File Sharing support were removed from Server back in September.

In the age of NAS devices like Synology that offer easy setup of many of these services, I understand why Apple is doing this. Still, there are bound to be many Server fans upset over the loss of features from a product that had a devoted following.

Apple has moved some Server features into High Sierra, making them available to all users. These include the Caching Service, which let users save bandwidth by having a Mac cache iCloud data, app updates, and more, for use by other devices on the network. File Sharing has also been moved to High Sierra, and Time Machine backups can be made using SMB backups built into High Sierra.

If you want to take a look at all the features that previously were in Server, the OS X Server features page is still online.


How to Use Your Mac to Easily Find the Best Wi-Fi Channel [Link]

WiFi Scan

My wireless network can be flaky at times, probably thanks to interference from other networks and devices. If you have an unreliable wireless connection, it could be because you’re not on the optimal wireless channel for your router and environment. Did you know that your Mac has a built-in tool to find the best wireless channel? The trick involves using the Wireless Diagnostics Utilities app that comes with your Mac.

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Find the Best Channel for Your WiFi Network With WiFi Stumbler

WiFi signal

I’ve recently started having issues with my WiFi network, such as dropouts and slowness. One of the first steps I’ve taken to address the problem is to try to determine if I’m getting interference from other networks. To see nearby networks, and what channels they’re using, I’ve found WiFi Stumbler to be valuable.

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Wi-Fi is Radiation Too

Wi-Fi is Radiation Too | 40Tech

According to a Dutch study, our beloved Wi-Fi — the stuff that large populations of the planet now use in their homes, their workplaces, where they shop, where they drink coffee, and pretty much everywhere else they go — may be killing our trees. Or at least contributing to it. The researchers of Wageningen University say that more analysis is required to reach a solid conclusion on the matter, but so far, it looks like the particular radiation that is Wi-Fi is not at all interested in becoming a tree-hugger.

The tests were done in urban areas, where the high Wi-Fi and mobile phone network concentrations battle it out with other not-so-nice-for-trees elements such as fuel and other particle emissions. This leads to an obvious question about whether the trees’ sickness is more a result of other side-effects of urban sprawl, but the researchers feel they have a pretty good case against Wi-Fi. This is unfortunate, as Wi-Fi has become more and more a part of our daily necessities. Either way, something that is in the air in areas of major and connected human cities is causing the upper and lower layers of leaves to die, leaving behind a “lead-like shine” — and apparently inhibiting the growth of corn cobs.

This news, while not entirely proven true, may mark down one more in an ever-growing list of our human comforts and advancements that may actually be harmful to our immediate environment.

What do you think?

Study: Wi-Fi Makes Our Trees Sick [Read Write Web (via PC World)]