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Category: linked (page 1 of 7)

Understanding Shortcuts in iOS 12 →

Matt Birchler writing for Birchtree.me:

I’m seeing a bunch of people saying Shortcuts are a power user-only feature. “No normal person will ever use these!” In their WWDC keynote, I think Apple leaned too hard into what Shortcuts can do for power users, and people lost the message that these are something users will benefit from even if they do zero work to set them up. Let me explain.

This is the best and most understandable overview of the Shortcuts feature coming in iOS 12, and explains how even “regular” users can utilize them. The article is worth a full read. If you aren’t someone who gets excited about the news coming out of Apple’s World Wide Developer Conference, you may not have heard about Shortcuts, an upcoming automation tool/framework/feature in iOS 12. Birchler also has a podcast on the topic that is next up in my feed.


Finder’s Stationery Pad Feature – How Is This Not More Well Known? →

Tim Hardwick, writing for MacRumors:

Stationery Pad is a handy way to nix a step in your workflow if you regularly use document templates on your Mac. The long-standing Finder feature essentially tells a file’s parent application to open a copy of it by default, ensuring that the original file remains unedited.

Follow the link for a way to set any file on your Mac to be a template file, so you don’t overwrite it. I don’t feel bad for not knowing about this trick, since I’ve never heard it discussed, and since the name doesn’t really describe what it does. On the other hand, I feel stupid for never wondering what that checkbox does. This will be very handy for automation tools like Keyboard Maestro.


DEVONthink adds iCloud sync →

Eric Böhnisch-Volkmann, writing for the Devonian Times (the DEVONtechnolgies blog):

Sychronization via iCloud was the no. 1 feature request on our list. And here we go: DEVONthink 2.10 and DEVONthink To Go 2.6 let you keep your databases in sync via iCloud and without entering anything except for the optional encryption password. No messing around with sync store names, server addresses, or login credentials. Add the iCloud sync location, check off the databases you want to sync, done. It can’t be any easier.

This is the feature in this update that will get most people excited, assuming they have enough iCloud space. But some of the other features, such as improvements to syncing on both platforms, are just as important. There’s a pretty good list here, so check out the full post.


Fix Your Contact List with a Centralized System →

Ryan Gray, writing at ryangray.co:

Of course, you can easily share one of your cards with anyone nearby (and get theirs). But a shared card is not just sent once. It’s a subscription. If you change your phone number or if you move you’ll be able to push the updates out to anyone who is subscribed. You’ll also be able to block anyone, revoke access, or prevent someone from sharing your card. Conversely you’ll be able to upgrade to the next level. For example if you become close friends with a coworker, they’ll be able to request access to the Close Friends version of your card. You’ll also be in control of what of your information can be shared with third party developers.

This article hits on a great concept – a better way to share your contact information with others that keeps you in control of that information, and also keeps your information up to date as it changes. Ryan Gray wants a privacy-oriented tech company (Apple) to come up with a cross-platform and centralized solution.

I love the idea, but worry that something like this wouldn’t gain enough traction. My contact information is half of the equation. The organization of my own list of contacts is the other half. My contact list is filled with duplicates and outdated data, as well as contacts I haven’t touched in 20 years. If the people in my contact list don’t embrace or trust a system like this, I’m not much better off. But we have to start somewhere, and this is the best idea I’ve heard.


iPhone J.D.’s Tips for using 3D Touch →

Jeff Richardson, writing for iPhone J.D.:

If you tap on the Messages app icon, you will probably see your most recent text message conversation.  But if you 3D Touch on the Messages app, you will see a list of names of folks who have recently had text message conversations with you.  Assuming that you wanted to send a message to, or review a recent message from, one of those three people, this is a faster way to jump directly to the text message conversation with that person.

If you’re like me, 3D Touch is a feature you intend to use more but never do. Maybe this article by Jeff Richardson is the impetus you need. Jeff describes several handy ways to use 3D Touch. If nothing else, make sure you heed the tip for using 3D Touch to move your cursor when typing.