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Category: Cloud (page 1 of 31)

How to Detect if Your ISP is Throttling Netflix and Other Online Services

With the FCC having rolled back Title II protections that classified the Internet as a public utility, you may wonder if your ISP is throttling your traffic. The Wehe app, available on both iOS and Android, allows you to do so.

Wehe - ISP detect throttling

The app is part of a study on ISP’s treatment of different kinds of traffic.

Wehe uses your device to exchange traffic recorded from real, popular apps like YouTube and Spotify—effectively making it look as if you are using those apps. As a result, if an ISP tries to slow down an YouTube, our app would see the same behavior. We then send the same app traffic, but replacing the content with randomized bytes , which prevents the ISPs from classifying the traffic. Our hypothesis is that the randomized traffic will not see application-specific shaping, but the original traffic will see it. We repeat these tests several times to rule out noise from bad network conditions, and tell you at the end whether your ISP is shaping your traffic.

Wehe: Check Your ISP for Net Neutrality Violations

Warning – the app takes a long time to perform its testing. That might be due to server overload.


Dropbox Project Infinite

This makes so much sense, I can’t believe nobody thought of it sooner:

Project Infinite will enable users to seamlessly and securely access all their Dropbox files from the desktop, regardless of how much space they have available on their hard drives. Everything in the company’s Dropbox that you’re given access to, whether it’s stored locally or in the cloud, will show up in Dropbox on your desktop. If it’s synced locally, you’ll see the familiar green checkmark, while everything else will have a new cloud icon.

In hindsight, it is inconvenient to have to hop over to the web interface to get the full power of Dropbox. This is a step in fixing that. All your Dropbox files show up in Finder or Windows Explorer, even if they’re not really on your device. When you want a file, you just double click on it, and it will download and open.

This showed up on the Dropbox Business Bog, and the discussion focused on company usage, so I’m guess it will roll out business plans first. I’m good with that, as I have a business plan, but I’d love it if it made its way to personal accounts as well.

A revolutionary new way to access all your files | | Dropbox Business Blog


Get Audio Files into Your Podcast Client with Huffduffer

I’m way late to the game on this one. Huffduffer is a service that I’ve heard mentioned several times on different podcasts, but I recently checked it out for the first time. Huffduffer has been described as the Instapaper for audio files, and the description is appropriate. The idea behind Huffduffer is that you can take individual audio files, including individual episodes of podcasts, and easily get them into your favorite podcast client.

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Flickr vs. 500px and more: Why I Use 5 Photo Sharing Sites

photo sharing servicesI’m an amateur hack when it comes to photography. I bought my first DSLR last year, and have been shooting away ever since. Thanks to having an amazing toddler at home to whom I gladly dedicate most of my free time, I haven’t had time to really get much better. That doesn’t mean that I don’t enjoy it.

One of the first things I did after accumulating some photos was look into options for storing them online. If you’re like me, you quickly discovered that it really fuels your enthusiasm when you get input or even just acknowledgment concerning your photographs. As a result, the five online services in my current arsenal run the gamut from serving as mostly storage, to being replete with sharing and community options. Here’s my take on these services, along with links to my photographs. In the comments below, let me know your favorite services, and feel free to share links to your photographs.

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Let Us Know Your Favorite iOS Apps, With Applr

Are you like me – a bit of an iOS app addict? I’ve never found Apple’s App Store to be particularly helpful for discovering new apps. A recent tweet by Adam Christianson of the MacCast mentioned something called Applr, which I had never heard of. It turns out that Applr is a web app that helps you find new iOS apps, by following other people and seeing what they’re using. Other users can also follow you, to see your favorite apps. Read more