Lily Hay Newman, writing for Wired:

Ads that automatically redirect you from your daily browsing to a flashy sweepstakes have long been an incredibly annoying facet of the internet. But the versions that have evolved on the mobile web are particularly vexing, because they can trap you with a pop-up “notification” and nowhere to go. And a recent surge in these mobile pop-ups, even on reputable sites, has left people more frustrated than ever.

Somehow yesterday’s article by Alex Hern, writing for the Guardian, seems very relevant:

Internet advertising firms are losing hundreds of millions of dollars following the introduction of a new privacy feature from Apple that prevents users from being tracked around the web. Advertising technology firm Criteo, one of the largest in the industry, says that the Intelligent Tracking Prevention (ITP) feature for Safari, which holds 15% of the global browser market, is likely to cut its 2018 revenue by more than a fifth compared to projections made before ITP was announced.

With annual revenue in 2016 topping $730m, the overall cost of the privacy feature on just one company is likely to be in the hundreds of millions of dollars.

These are two separate but related issues. The push back against online advertising arose because of how readers were being abused with privacy violations, and by ads that destroyed the browsing experience. What did these advertisers expect?