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Tag: iOS (page 2 of 17)

Hyper-Scheduling Light With Things

I’m a big fan of the work of David Sparks of MacSparky and the Mac Power Users Podcast. He’s recently written a few posts on what he has called “hyper-scheduling.” The CliffsNotes version of hyper-scheduling is that David blocks off time in his calendar for performing certain tasks. Jeff Perry of the Tablet Habit does this too, calling it Time Blocking.

As I’ve read David and Jeff’s insights, I realized I’m doing “hyper-scheduling light” (perhaps ultralight) with Things. This is one of the reasons Things has clicked for me.

hyper-scheduling Light

My job isn’t suited for the scheduling of specific times during the day for performing certain tasks. I’m faced with too many unavoidable interruptions and too many tasks that arise suddenly and need to be handled on short notice. As much as I’d love to go into “do not disturb” mode to churn through work, there are too many downsides of this for me on most days in my line of work.

Despite these roadblocks, I do have a general idea how much time I’ll have each day for churning through my task list. I just don’t know exactly when during the day that time will fall. Enter Things.

With its “Today” and “Upcoming” views, Things makes it easy to schedule my tasks for certain dates. I set an item’s start date, and it appears in the view for that day. 1 During my weekly review, which usually occurs on Friday, I plan out my next week. I go through my actions and tasks and decide what I want to get done on each day of the upcoming week. When a particular day arrives, my task list for the day is waiting for me.

This isn’t for everyone. Some people work better diving into their projects each day, and picking from their tasks or next actions. That became too overwhelming for me, which is one of the reasons I switched to Things. I wanted a tool that would not only help me organize my tasks, but would help me do them as well by bringing them to me on certain days. Things does that for me by allowing me to schedule them.


  1. OmniFocus supports start dates as well, and you can view a schedule in Forecast view, but items that aren’t completed on their start date fall off of the Forecast. It remains to be seen whether the new version of OmniFocus will change this.


iOS 11.3 packs charge management for iPads plugged in for long periods of time →

Christian Zibreg, writing for iDownloadBlog:

When the maximum charge level is reduced to protect the battery, the power indicator in the iOS status bar will display the charge based on the adjusted maximum battery level.

The maximum charge level will revert back to the previous level when iPad is no longer connected to power for prolonged periods and “as conditions and battery health allow.”

The main battery news of the 11.3 update was the addition of the iPhone battery health feature. I haven’t seen the iPad charge management feature discussed much. With more people using their iPads as their only computers, the lesson here is not to keep your iPad plugged in all the time like you would with a desktop computer.


OmniFocus vs. Things: Why I Switched

If you’ve visited 40Tech lately you’ve seen several posts on Things, which is now my task management app of choice. My switch to Things surprised me. For a few years, I was an OmniFocus snob. I fancied myself a power user, and thought other task management apps were somehow inferior because they didn’t have the level of power offered by OmniFocus.

Read more


This great iOS Spotlight trick lets you know everything about a person →

Charlie Sorrel writing for Cult of Mac:

Somewhere after the launch of iOS 11, Apple tweaked Spotlight search to be way more useful. Now, when you search for a person, you can trigger a sub-search that lets you find everything you have on them, from emails, to iMessages, to their contact details, through WhatsApp messages, to calendar events. Anywhere that your selected contact exists on your iPhone or iPad will show up in the list.

This Cult of Mac title is a bit click-baity, but the tip is still handy. If you’re like me, Spotlight on iOS is one of those features that you really need to spend some time learning. It can even be a half-decent way to start a web search.

I could see myself using Spotlight similar to how I use Drafts on iOS. I start almost all text in Drafts – tasks, notes, email, even blog posts. Spotlight could be where I start all searches, and then drill down deeper from there.


TIL (Things 3) – Filter list by multiple tags →

Bryan Villarin writing for All Narfed Up:

When viewing a list on all platforms (Mac, iPad, or iPhone), you can filter by more than one tag.

Hit the link for details on how to filter on macOS and iOS. Things 3 is beautiful and can be simple, but there’s power for those willing to look for it. iOS itself is similar – it is simple for those who want an easy experience, with power features optional and out of sight unless you want them.