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Tag: HomeKit

HomeRun – Customize your HomeKit Complications on the Apple Watch

Ryan Christoffel writing for MacStories:

First, HomeRun now provides the option to set different complications to appear on your watch face throughout the day during select time periods. You can, for example, tell HomeRun that starting at 6:00am every day, you want its complication to trigger your ‘Good Morning’ scene, then at 8:00am it should instead trigger your ‘I’m leaving’ scene, and at 5:00pm it should change to activate ‘I’m home’. Not only will the action change, but the complication itself will visually transform at the time you’ve programmed.

If you have the nagging feeling that your Apple Watch should be better at triggering HomeKit scenes, check out HomeRun. You can add customized complications to your Watch face, and this latest update allows those complications to change based on the time of the day.


Bring Devices into HomeKit with Your Synology →

Casey Liss, at Liss is More:

The final piece that really opened everything up for me was realizing that my Synology has Docker support. Furthermore, after but a moment of digging, I was able to find instructions specifically for setting up Homebridge on a Synology in Docker.

Following those instructions, within about 10 minutes, I had a Docker container on my Synology, running Homebridge, and allowing me to see my not-yet-updated Wemo devices in HomeKit!

Homebridge is a software bridge that allows you to use certain non-HomeKit devices with HomeKit. Two years ago I installed Homebridge on my Mac mini server, which let me add my garage door and my Wemo switches to HomeKit. This process, which required command line dabbling in Terminal, was convoluted enough (for someone of my skill set) that I eventually abandoned it.

A week ago I resurrected Homebridge. This time I installed it on my Synology. As the above post by Casey Liss suggests, this process was MUCH easier than my first go-around. I had planned to publish a complete write-up of the process, but Casey’s post (and the link it contains) should get you on your way.

I followed a slightly different process than Casey followed, as I hadn’t discovered the instructions he referenced. I instead began by installing Docker on my Synology via the Synology’s Package Center, and then used these instructions to upload and install Homebridge.

No matter how you get Homebridge up and running, I encourage you to give it a shot if Homebridge has intrigued you. Aside from pasting text into a configuration file to get plugins working, the entire process was mostly a point-and-click process.


What Should You Do with All Your Smarthome Gear When You Move? →

Craig Lloyd writing for How-To Geek:

Smarthome devices are expensive, and if you’ve decked out your entire house with all sorts of fun smarthome toys, that’s thousands of dollars of extra value added onto your house, which can make for a great negotiating tool when it comes time to sell.

I’m not planning to move, but have still thought about this whenever I install a new piece of gear in the house, such as my ecobee thermostats. I’ve always assumed that if it’s in the house when your house is being shown, that’s a fixture and your buyers are going to assume it’s part of the price unless you spell it out otherwise. I don’t practice real estate law, though. Regardless of the law, you BETTER spell this out pretty explicitly if for no other reason than you’re going to have ticked off buyers if they saw a house with fancy smart home gadgets that aren’t there come final walkthrough.


Use Your Wemo with HomeKit

wemo-and-homekit

In my last post I discussed how I was able to get my Liftmaster garage door opener working with HomeKit, even though it wasn’t officially HomeKit compatible. I used a HomeKit bridge called Homebridge, running on my Mac, to accomplish this (Linux would work, too). Setting up Homebridge and the first plugin (Liftmaster) was the hard part. From there, getting the Wemo plugin set up and installed was easy.

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Use HomeKit With Your Chamberlain Liftmaster MyQ Garage Door

If you have a MyQ-enabled garage door opener, and you want to hook your door into HomeKit, take a look at Homebridge. Homebridge is a NodeJS server that runs on your Mac, or on a Linux machine such as a Raspberry Pi. Homebridge acts as a HomeKit bridge and allows you to use certain non-HomeKit devices with HomeKit. That might sound like a mouthful, and it certainly isn’t trivial to set up, but it isn’t as difficult as it might seem.

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