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Tag: Apple (page 1 of 8)

Apple discontinues its own photo printing service, recommends third-party Photos Projects apps instead →

Benjamin Mayo writing for 9to5Mac:

Apple is discontinuing its Photo Print Products service, which has been integrated into iPhoto since its launch in 2002. The service expanded from simple prints, to albums, photo books, and calendars.

Maybe I’m a dinosaur, but I used this service every year to make a Mother’s Day calendar for my wife and our daughter’s grandmothers. The story does mention some third-party apps that include Photos Projects extensions, so this isn’t a complete loss. Still, I’m sad to see it go. I hope the third-party solutions are as elegant as the Apple solution.


Fix Your Contact List with a Centralized System →

Ryan Gray, writing at ryangray.co:

Of course, you can easily share one of your cards with anyone nearby (and get theirs). But a shared card is not just sent once. It’s a subscription. If you change your phone number or if you move you’ll be able to push the updates out to anyone who is subscribed. You’ll also be able to block anyone, revoke access, or prevent someone from sharing your card. Conversely you’ll be able to upgrade to the next level. For example if you become close friends with a coworker, they’ll be able to request access to the Close Friends version of your card. You’ll also be in control of what of your information can be shared with third party developers.

This article hits on a great concept – a better way to share your contact information with others that keeps you in control of that information, and also keeps your information up to date as it changes. Ryan Gray wants a privacy-oriented tech company (Apple) to come up with a cross-platform and centralized solution.

I love the idea, but worry that something like this wouldn’t gain enough traction. My contact information is half of the equation. The organization of my own list of contacts is the other half. My contact list is filled with duplicates and outdated data, as well as contacts I haven’t touched in 20 years. If the people in my contact list don’t embrace or trust a system like this, I’m not much better off. But we have to start somewhere, and this is the best idea I’ve heard.


Save your AirPods’ serial number to replace lost parts →

Dave Mark, writing for the Loop:

If you lose the case and don’t have the serial number anywhere, you can’t even replace the case without it.

This seems a little crazy. The full article at the Loop contains instructions for locating your serial number. I have yet to lose the AirPods individually, but have misplaced the case (with AirPods inside) a couple of times.


The iPhone Battery Replacement Program Has Genius Bar Appointments in Short Supply

(UPDATE 2018-02-01 – I went online again this morning, and appointments were more plentiful. I have no idea if that means Apple has added capacity, or if my previous experience uncovered  a temporary glitch in their system.)

If you need a Genius Bar appointment for an Apple device, good luck. It’s only one source, but an Apple online advisor has told me that Genius Bars are booked solid dealing with the iPhone battery replacement program.

I ‘m having a power issue with my iPad Pro, and tried to schedule a Genius Bar Appointment for the Apple Store near me. You’re normally able to go online and book these appointments as much as a week in advance, but there wasn’t a single opening over the next week. I thought I might have better luck if I spoke to an online Apple advisor, so I went that route, and she wasn’t able to get me an appointment at my local store either.1 She told me that Genius Bars are at capacity due to the battery replacement program.

 

With as much press coverage as the battery replacement program received, this isn’t the least bit surprising. This is something to keep in mind if you are having any issues with your Apple devices.


  1. I’m not sure if she didn’t have the ability to schedule an appointment even if the Genius Bar’s schedule was booked (i.e,, the schedule is the schedule, and there are no appointments held open for online advisors to claim), or my problem didn’t warrant this measure.


Apple Releases Employee Starter Guides for Mac and iOS

If you’re trying to get coworkers up to speed on Mac or iOS, Apple has recently released two books to help: Employee Starter Guide for Mac and Employee Starter Guide for iOS. I’ve just started going through them, but they seem to start at the ground level, and build from there.

Employee Starter Guide for Mac

Both books are broken into four sections: Learning the Basics, Next Steps in Working with Mac/iOS, Extending Productivity Further, and Support for Mac/iOS. Each section is broken into subsections that go into detail about using a Mac/iOS device for different aspects of work, such as for collaboration.

Employee Starter Guide for iOS

Employee Starter Guide for Mac sample subsections

The books include recommendations for third party apps where appropriate. For example, the iOS book recommends PDF Expert and three other apps in the “Annotating PDFs and Forms” section.

Tech geeks are accustomed to finding answers and help online, but these books might be helpful to “normal” users who are just getting started with Mac or iOS. If you are looking for reference materials for your employees, or even for yourself, check these out.

Hat tip to Dave Marra, who mentioned this on Twitter.