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Category: Mac (page 2 of 24)

How I Use: Search in Mail on macOS →

Lee Garrett, writing for MyProductiveMac:

You aren’t limited to one search term. Once you’ve clicked on your first search element, continue typing and another list of potential search criteria will appear below. Click again, rinse, repeat as often as necessary.

Search in Mail on macOS has always been a bit of a chore to me. If you want to up your game in Mail, there are several good tips in this post. In addition to the one above, the post covers the use of natural language, boolean operators, and saved searches.


macOS: Put the iCloud Drive Icon on Your Dock →


Andrew Orr, writing for The Mac Observer:

There is a hidden directory inside of macOS that contains the app icons for built-in services like iCloud Drive. You probably wouldn’t know they are there because you’ll have to enter a specific file path in order to access them. Here’s how to put the iCloud Drive Icon on your dock for easy access to Apple’s cloud storage.

I’ve been moving more and more of my storage into iCloud Drive, so I wanted to make it more easily accessible. I found this post from last year when searching for a way to access iCloud Drive from my menu bar. Putting it in the dock will have to do for now, although the icon isn’t interactive and only acts as a shortcut to open the iCloud Drive folder in Finder.

If you’re in the Finder, the Command-Shift-I keyboard shortcut will open the iCloud Drive folder as well. I can see myself cooking up a Keyboard Maestro macro to create a system-wide shortcut.


Using the Workflow App on My iPad to Control My Desk Phone

A simple change in scenery can do wonders for productivity. For me that sometimes means sitting in a recliner in the corner of my office, using my MacBook and my office phone headset to make and receive calls. That’s possible because my firm’s VOIP phone service, Mitel, offers a Mac app that lets me trigger outgoing calls on my office phone. As long as I have my MacBook and telephone headset with me, my actual telephone unit can be across the office.

This process doesn’t work if I want to use my iPad to initiate calls. The Mitel iOS app won’t trigger calls on another device, such as my office phone. Not to be deterred, I put together a workflow to accomplish this. It sounds much more complicated (and much slower) than it really is.

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How to check your Mac for 32-bit apps before Apple kicks ’em to the curb →

Bryan Clark writing for TNW:

Apple has recently begun warning users about 32-bit application compatibility. These applications are relics — although some are still in heavy use without a development team to support or update them — and will one day be phased out for the 64-bit versions most developers have been spitting out for at least half a decade.

Just as iOS 11 dropped support for 32-bit apps, it looks like the writing is on the wall for 32-bit apps in macOS. Hit the link for a method to check which of your current macOS apps are 32-bit.

Just because an app is currently 32-bit doesn’t mean the developer won’t get it ready by the time macOS requires it. Many apps will only require a re-compile.

When I reviewed my list, the app that gives me the greatest cause for concern is Clarify, a great app for annotating images and creating tutorials. The app is no longer sold and is in maintenance mode. I hope “maintenance mode” includes getting it ready for the 64-bit requirement.


Hyper-Scheduling Light With Things

I’m a big fan of the work of David Sparks of MacSparky and the Mac Power Users Podcast. He’s recently written a few posts on what he has called “hyper-scheduling.” The CliffsNotes version of hyper-scheduling is that David blocks off time in his calendar for performing certain tasks. Jeff Perry of the Tablet Habit does this too, calling it Time Blocking.

As I’ve read David and Jeff’s insights, I realized I’m doing “hyper-scheduling light” (perhaps ultralight) with Things. This is one of the reasons Things has clicked for me.

hyper-scheduling Light

My job isn’t suited for the scheduling of specific times during the day for performing certain tasks. I’m faced with too many unavoidable interruptions and too many tasks that arise suddenly and need to be handled on short notice. As much as I’d love to go into “do not disturb” mode to churn through work, there are too many downsides of this for me on most days in my line of work.

Despite these roadblocks, I do have a general idea how much time I’ll have each day for churning through my task list. I just don’t know exactly when during the day that time will fall. Enter Things.

With its “Today” and “Upcoming” views, Things makes it easy to schedule my tasks for certain dates. I set an item’s start date, and it appears in the view for that day. 1 During my weekly review, which usually occurs on Friday, I plan out my next week. I go through my actions and tasks and decide what I want to get done on each day of the upcoming week. When a particular day arrives, my task list for the day is waiting for me.

This isn’t for everyone. Some people work better diving into their projects each day, and picking from their tasks or next actions. That became too overwhelming for me, which is one of the reasons I switched to Things. I wanted a tool that would not only help me organize my tasks, but would help me do them as well by bringing them to me on certain days. Things does that for me by allowing me to schedule them.


  1. OmniFocus supports start dates as well, and you can view a schedule in Forecast view, but items that aren’t completed on their start date fall off of the Forecast. It remains to be seen whether the new version of OmniFocus will change this.