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Author: Evan Kline (page 1 of 157)

Not saying that’s a bad thing. I still like using iOS, but view it for what it is (for me) instead of basking in its relative newness, & the excitement that comes with it and with the greater frequency of changes and improvements to it. I’m often a sucker for that stuff.


I increasingly find myself wishing I were at my Mac, not because of shortcomings of the iPad, but because I get more delight out of macOS. I think that makes me an animal in tech circles. Took a few years, but the “newness” of the iPad has worn off for me so it is just a tool.


A Few Simple Apple Maps Tips →

Gabe Weatherhead at Macdrifter:

If I’m already following a route and I’m getting low on gas or caffeine, I swipe up from the bottom to reveal some new options. There are quick search options for gas and food.

I’m trying to reduce my Google footprint. As a result, I find myself using Apple Maps more than in the past. This post digs into some of the less obvious features of Apple Maps, such as avoiding highways.


Master macOS Mojave screenshots →

Jeff Benjamin writing for 9to5Mac:

After a screenshot is taken, you’ll notice that it doesn’t instantly appear on your Desktop as it did with previous versions of macOS. Instead, macOS Mojave has adopted an iOS-like system that places a floating thumbnail of the screenshot in the bottom right-hand corner of the screen, allowing users to interact with the screenshot before it is saved to the default location. By adopting this method, users can quickly markup, drag and drop, and share screenshots.

The above excerpt covers just one way the taking of screenshots has changed in macOS Mojave. Apple has made the process much more iOS-like, and added additional functionality, including annotations and screen recording. If you’re a longtime Mac user who needs to learn the new features, or if you want a thorough overview of how screenshots work on Mac, the 9to5Mac article will get you well on your way.


Apple Frames: A Shortcut for Framing Screenshots from Every Apple Device →

Federico Viticci writing for MacStories:

When I published my iPhone XS Frames shortcut two weeks ago, I noted that my goal was to eventually support screenshots and device templates from other Apple devices, starting with the Apple Watch and MacBook Pro. After two weeks spent rebuilding the shortcut and asking Silvia to prepare several more templates, I’m happy to re-introduce my shortcut as the new and improved Apple Frames – a comprehensive custom shortcut to frame screenshots taken on every Apple device. Well, at least most of the current ones that the company is still selling.

Stop looking for a way to create nicely framed screenshots for Apple devices, and just use this. I used the previous incarnation for iPhone screenshots, and it was fantastic. I could lament the absence of support for the 15 inch MacBook Pro, but that would be greedy. This is a completely free tool, and a good example of what you often can find at MacStories, and its subscription service, Club MacStories.