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It’s not so much a difference in how the intellectual property is used, but in whether or not it gets into Canada at all — especially when it comes to the distribution of film and television. Sometimes, even when something comes to Canada (at least in the case of some animated shows), it is even re-recorded (often badly) in Canadian studios with new voice actors. This happened with the show Dragon Ball Z, when the US Cartoon Network version had been on for years already, in Canada. Most of the time, though, it is related to media companies wanting retain a stranglehold on the digital display of their property, which leads to no outside US access to Hulu, Pandora, Last.FM (though this may have changed with their subscription service), Mogg, TV network websites’ full episodes, and formerly Netflix. As mentioned, the Canadian Netflix library is pitiful compared to the US Watch Now service. Even iTunes and App store offerings are less plentiful in Canada, including for the new AppleTV, or so I’ve been lead to believe.

I should mention that the CRTC (it’s like the US FCC) is responsible for some of this, as well, as they get very militant about promoting Canadian content, which sometimes imposes rules and potential costs on the external media groups.