The Death of Aperture. Good news?

If you didn’t see the news today, Apple will be ceasing development of Aperture when the new OS X Photos app is released next year. At first blush, this seems like bad news for Aperture users. ApertureExpert has an interesting take on the news, however, that actually has me feeling hopeful for the future of the Photos app. The Photos app as a hub for your photos, with iOS-like extensions allowing any other app, including Lightroom, to interact with it? Count me in, if it comes to pass.

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The Top 7 Features From WWDC

Wwdc 14 logo

Apple gave its annual keynote at the Worldwide Developers Conference yesterday, announcing a bevy of new features for both iOS and Mac OS X. I was actually most excited about the Mac stuff, but iOS received some much-needed love as well. The number of websites covering WWDC is overwhelming, but that won’t stop me from listing the features that got me the most excited.

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The Major News From Apple’s Last 10 WWDC Keynotes

If you’re getting excited for new hardware announcements at Apple’s  World Wide Developer Conference, you’re probably going to be disappointed. Harry McCracken takes a look back at the last decade, and reminds us of the nature of the conference, and also highlights the major announcements at each conference.

Sure, consumers are watching, and Apple hopes that they’re dazzled. But WWDC keynotes are usually the least gadget-centric events which Apple holds, and even though people who covet new Apple products pay close attention, they’re not the primary audience.

 

While that might not be surprising news to some, the article is still an interesting read for its look back at each conference, and the major announcements at each one (and the reaction to each from the press, and investors). While you’re there, take some time to check out the relaunch of Technologizer as an independent blog, after 2+ years under TIME.com’s umbrella.

∞ A Decade’s Worth of WWDC Keynotes | Technologizer

Disable iMessage Before Switching Away From an iPhone . . . Or Else

A former Lifehacker editor noticed a big problem after switching from iOS to Android:

I recently switched from an iPhone to Android, and discovered shortly thereafter that my phone number was still associated with iMessage, meaning that any time someone with an iPhone tried texting me, I’d receive nothing, and they’d get a “Delivered” receipt in their Messages app as though everything were working as expected.

iMessage purgatory | Adam Pash

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The iPhone 4S: a Revolution in Smartphone Gaming?

The iPhone 4S: a Revolution in Smartphone Gaming?  | 40Tech

40Tech is pleased to present a guest post by Simon.

Although Apple’s new iPhone did not electrify either the media or the stock market quite so much as Apple might have hoped, it has certainly proved popular with their most vital audience: the consumers, who have made it the most successful iPhone launch ever, with 4 million sales already. It’s achieved worldwide success, including unprecedented penetration in the Chinese market.

Many people probably picked up the 4S for the Siri Personal Assistant, or the much-improved 8Mp camera, or just because it’s fun to have the very latest high-end phone. Hopefully they will sooner or later appreciate the true power of this new handset, which goes far beyond what we’ve come to expect in smartphones, particularly in several areas crucial to gaming: notably processor power, graphics chip, and the possibilities unlocked by the iCloud and AirPlay services.

Processor

The A5 processor in the Apple 4S is the same one used in the iPad 2. Yes, that means the latest iPhone is more powerful than the original iPad – a frankly staggering achievement, allowing game developers to create some seriously resource-intense games for the 4S.

Graphics

The graphics chip is also state-of-the-art, allowing for shading, lighting, and movement graphics that are at least as good as most gaming consoles. Infinity Blade II, the sequel to earlier the hit iPhone game, will probably be the first big release to really show off the new graphical capabilities. It won’t be the last, though – expect movie-quality graphics in a number of new 4S games next year.

Gaming in the iCloud

The iCloud has some great possibilities for gaming. Cloud computing in general has a variety of potential security issues, not yet fully explored or studied, but even if you’re wary of storing your work documents in the cloud, you can certainly save your computer games there. Cloud gaming allows you to start a game on your iPad, and continue it on your iPhone if you don’t have the iPad with you, without any hassle.

Not just a player; an AirPlayer

AirPlay lets you use your iPhone as a controller, moving the visible action from your phone’s 4.3 inch screen to your (suitably compatible) TV screen, and the audio to your surround sound system. Combine this with the iCloud possibilities, whereby you can seamlessly move the action from one device to another since your saved games are stored in the cloud, and some intriguing options open up for game developers. Fancy developing a game character in solo play on the iPhone and then bringing it along to a group gaming session via AirPlay? With the right game – not yet developed – it should be a possibility. Group games via AirPlay, using your iPhone as a controller and your TV screen to show off the action, are already available.

Cheap as chips (potato, not digital)

The very cheap price of most iOS games is a huge boon, too – look out for Diddly next year (free download) for a fiendishly competitive trivia game you can play on your AirPlay compatible TV. Hundreds of one-man indie developers and small teams are working on new titles, often inspired by classic 80s and 90s games, with prices from nothing to just £1-2.

Simon writes on behalf of Best Mobile Contracts, the UK’s leading mobile phone comparison website.