Apple Watch Q&A – Improve Your Office Workflow

I recently sat down for a question and answer session about the Apple Watch. That Q&A is up on my firm’s website, and does a pretty good job of identifying what I like and don’t like about the watch. For me, the two biggest benefits to the watch are the ability to quickly get information into my system, and to quickly review information and get on with what I’m doing. I don’t use the watch as a tool for generating work. Instead, it “greases the skids” and helps me get work done on my other devices.

How Can the Apple Watch Improve Office Workflow? Q&A with Attorney Evan Kline | Katherman, Briggs & Greenberg, LLP

Writing Legal Briefs with Scrivener

Scrivener toolbar

WordPerfect 5.1 is legendary among tech geeks of a certain age, and still has devoted users. I used various incarnations of WordPerfect as my main word processor and brief[1] writing tool until just a few years ago, when I succumbed to the inevitable force of change, and switched to Microsoft Word. Now, though, I’m not even using a traditional word processor as my main brief writing application, because I’ve discovered that Scrivener is a fantastic tool for that purpose.

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Apple Watch – the Ultimate OmniFocus Capture Tool

I’ve been progressing through the MacSparky OmniFocus Video Field Guide, which has giving me some “ah-ha” moments. I’d already known how to use Siri and the Reminders app to get tasks into OmniFocus with my voice, but I’d fallen off the wagon and hadn’t used that method in months. When the Field Guide covered that method, it hit me like a ton of bricks – since you can add reminders to the Reminders app with your watch via Siri, you also can add tasks to OmniFocus the same way.

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Restore OS X Photos’ Lost Functionality With Automator

I’ve been an Aperture user for a couple of years now, and have debating what the future will hold for my workflow, in light of the sunsetting of Aperture in favor of OS X’s new Photos app. I’ve played with Photos a bit, and like much about the app. There are some features I need, though, that are currently missing in Photos. One of those features is the ability to export photos with custom sizes. It looks like there may be a pretty easy workaround to that problem.

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AnyList for iOS – For When OmniFocus and Evernote Aren’t Quite Right

AnyList

I’ve never been shy about foregoing the use of one tool if another tool works better for a particular purpose. I use OmniFocus as my primary productivity tool, and Evernote as my main information repository for non-sensitive data. Recently though, I decided there had to be a better solution for creating simple lists. Both OmniFocus and Evernote are great, but are overkill for simple lists.

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Quickly Extract an App Icon For Use Elsewhere

[Mac] Someone please tell me why I didn’t discovery this, oh, maybe six years ago? If you have a blog and write about software, you’re constantly looking looking for high quality icons to use. The method quoted at the bottom of this post from Macworld makes it easy.

Even easier, I’ve found, is a tip I stumbled upon a while back on another site. I’ve been unable to relocate the source, so regretfully can’t credit it, but I remember the tip: find an application in your Finder, and drag it onto the Preview icon in your Mac’s dock. Preview will then open, showing you all of the artwork used in that application, including the icon. You can then export a high quality version of it to use in your blog post.

Use Preview to extract app icons

In the Finder, select the program in question, and press Command-C (or if you love menus, select Edit -> Copy). You’ve now got a full copy of the application on your clipboard. . . Now launch Preview, and press Command-N (File -> New from Clipboard for you menu users). You may be surprised at the result: a full copy of the chosen application’s icons, in every available size.

Easily view an application’s icons | Macworld

3 Note-taking Apps, Used Together

For the past few years, I’ve been using three note taking apps side by side. Two of the three apps have stayed the same over the years, while the third has changed a couple of times. Why three apps? It’s partially a function of the strengths and weaknesses of the apps I use, but it’s largely a function of my brain liking to keep different types of data segregated into different apps. In my system, each app serves a different purpose:

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Scrivener for iOS Enters Closed Beta

If you’ve been waiting for Scrivener to hit the iPad and iPhone, there’s finally light at the end of the tunnel. Literature and Latte, the popular writing app’s developer, has announced that Scrivener for iOS is now feature complete and has entered a closed beta. The initial version of the iOS version will use Dropbox to sync with the Mac and Windows versions. A summer release has been targeted.

I’ve found Scrivener on the Mac to be quite handy for legal writing. I can organize research within the app, and break down my document into sections that I can easily rearrange. The grand plan, of course, is to use the app to write a novel some day.

The Cellar Door » A Quick iOS Update | Literature and Latte blog